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Between 1550 and 1800, science changed profoundly. Our understanding of the world around us was transformed by scientific discoveries.

From the observation of previously unidentified planets to the identification of underlying physical principles of the universe, this period changed how we understood and researched the world around us. The practice of science itself also changed, beginning to acquire characteristics that we associate with modern science today, from the carrying out of experiments to the preoccupation with precision measurement.

New kinds of institutions fostered and championed these new practices and served as hubs for debating and disseminating scientific discoveries. Founded in 1660 the Royal Society was, and continues to be, one of Britain’s most important and active scientific establishments.